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Year 10,172 Contasta Ar


Slave Honor



This is a short narrative and quotes from the Books I have found to be of interest on the topic of Slave Honor.
I make no pronouncements on these matters, but report them as I find them.
Arrive at your own conclusions.

I wish you well,
Fogaban


Do slaves have honor?

Well, yes and no.

Honor, by definition, can be taken, mostly, two ways.

Honor can be something regarded as a rare opportunity and bringing pride and pleasure; a privilege.

And honor can be the quality of knowing and doing what is morally right.

Within the context of the Gorean environment if you were to replace privilege in the verb form as opposed to honor and it still makes sense then it does not equate to the use of honor in the noun context, in other words, not honor as a moral compass - the right thing to do.

None of the quotes which speak of slaves and honor show the slave to have honor in the sense of a moral compass. In fact, two quotes specifically show slaves do not have honor in that sense.

It is not uncommon for a girl who is even trivially displeasing to be whipped. I looked at the large, handsome fellow. I had no honor to protect, no pride to uphold, for I was slave.
Slave Girl of Gor     Book 11     Page 90

And the slave, I reminded myself, does not belong to herself. She belongs to her master. She has no self to defend, no honor to preserve, no person to strive to keep isolated and inviolate.
Conspirators of Gor     Book 31     Page 111

Here are three more examples of honor and slaves:
But notice how, in each one of these, the word Privilege can be used in the place of Honor.

"Although you are only a slave your master is permitting you to serve him," I said. "This is a great honor."
Slave Girl of Gor     Book 11     Page 406

"It is a great honor for me, Master," she said, "that one such as you should select Beverly to serve you."
Rogue of Gor     Book 15     Page 200

What a precious and glorious honor, what a coveted privilege, for a slave, to be permitted to serve her master!
Prize of Gor     Book 27     Page 228

Privilege is not the same as Integrity, Dignity, Reputation, Showing Respect to others,
Being Faithful or Having earned the Trust of others

But wait, some may say, what about Elinor?

The example of Elinor, some believe, shows that slaves do indeed have honor.
Elinor is the perfect example of a slave showing Integrity, Dignity and a Moral Fortitude when she warned Bosk not to drink the poisoned wine.

Here is that excerpt from Captive of Gor beginning on page 359:

I took the packet of poison from my rep-cloth kitchen tunic, and dissolved it in the wine. I had been told there was enough there to bring a hundred men to an excruciating death. I swirled the wine, and discarded the packet.
It was ready.
"Wine!" I heard from the hall.
. . .
Elinor," said Bosk, at the head of the table. "I want wine." He was one of the few men, or women, on Gor who spoke my name as it had been spoken on Earth. I slowly approached him.
. . .

I went to Bosk, of Port Kar. I would pour the wine. Then I would be seized, and, doubtless by nightfall, tortured and impaled.

He held forth the goblet. The eyes of Telima were upon me. I could not look her in the eyes.

I poured the wine.

"I am of Treve," Rask of Treve had told me, in the warehouse, where he stood bound to the wall. "Do not stain my honor."

I wept.

"What is wrong, Elinor?" asked Bosk.

"I am all right, Master," I told him.

"I am of Treve," had said Rask of Treve. "Do not stain my honor."

I hated then men, and their wars, and their cruelties, and their frivolous honors. It was we, their women, who suffered their madness. No Rask of Treve would not purchase his life for the price I had agreed to pay, but the decision was not his, but mine, mine, and I loved him, and could not let him die!

"Do not stain my honor," he had said.

Bosk of Port Kar lifted the cup to his lips.

I put forth my hand. "Do not drink it, Master," I said. "It is poisoned."
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Pages 359 - 360

Yes, you could reason that Elinor's sense of honor would not allow her to poison Bosk.

I'll tell you what, we'll get back to that one in a minute.

First, I wanted to talk about Elinor's character. Elinor's honor.

For her to show honor when it came to poisoning Bosk's wine one would think she was generally an honorable person, already.

So we'll examine Elinor's character on Gor, wait, we'll begin with her character on Earth.

What was she like in school?

Our parents were wealthy and substantial grants to the schools and colleges were often made following our graduations. Also, I had never found men, and many of my instructors were such, hard to please. Indeed, they seemed eager to please me. I was failed in one course, in French. My instructor in this case was a woman. The Dean of Students, as was his wont in such circumstances, refused to accept the grade. I took a brief examination with another instructor, and the grade became an A. The woman resigned from the school that Spring. I was sorry, but she should have known better.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 2

Yes, there's more;

Affluent and beautiful, I carried myself with a flair. I knew that I was better than other people, and was not afraid to show them, in my manner, that this was true. Interestingly, instead of being angered, most people, whatever may have been their private feelings, seemed impressed and a bit frightened of me. They accepted me at the face value which I set upon myself, which was considerable. They would try to please me. I used to amuse myself with them, sometimes pouting, pretending to be angry or displeased, then smiling to let them know that I had forgiven them. They seemed grateful, radiant. How I despised them. How I used them! They bored me. I was rich, and fortunate and beautiful. They were nothing.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 3

Perhaps she gets better after graduation;

But I was Elinor Brinton, of Park Avenue, of Earth! She had been rich, beautiful, smartly attired, tasteful, sophisticated; she had been well educated and traveled; she had been decisive, confident; she had carried her wealth and her beauty with élan; and she had deserved her position in society; it had been rightfully hers, for she had been a gifted, high-order, superbly intelligent individual, an altogether superior person! She deserved everything that she had had! Whatever she had had she should have had, for she was that kind of person! That was the kind of person she was!
. . .

I had always had my way before, with both women and men. I could get extensions for my term papers, I could get a new fur wrap, when I wished. When I tired of one auto I would have another. I could always petition for what I wished, or wheedle for it, or look sad, or pout. I would always get what I wished.
Here I did not have my way.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 57

Ok, ok, that was Elinor on Earth. Big difference. Undoubtedly she changes on Gor.
Yes, certainly, now that Elinor is on Gor, surely her honor begins to influence her actions;

I was seized from behind by the two men who had held my wrists. I watched Targo's retreating back. I did not dare call out to him. He was no longer interested in me. The two men dragged me to the wagon tongue.

There were ten girls on one side, nine on the other.

I saw the girl who had beaten me, Lana, some positions ahead of me. I noted, suddenly, that she was harnessed. There were buckled straps on her wrists, fastening her in place. And about her body, in a broad loop, passing over her left shoulder and across her right hip, was a wide, heavy leather strap, which was bolted into the wagon tongue. The other girls were similarly fastened. Buckled straps were placed on my wrists. Over my shoulder, about my body, was passed a heavy loop of leather.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Pages 54 - 55

I leaned against the leather strap, pretending to push. They did not need me to pull the wagon. They had pulled it before. I dug my feet into the grass, as though straining. I grunted a little, to add to the effect.
. . .

I cried out with pain, and humiliation, as the switch struck my body.

Ute laughed.

I threw all my weight against the strap, sobbing, pushing with all my might.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 56

Alright, fine, she's on a strange new world, scared and totally unsure of her surroundings, fair enough.

Now we see where the girls are teaching the Gorean language to Elinor, notice how she honorably accepts their help.

Once I noted, speaking to Inge, that Ute, regularly, made certain grammatical errors. "Yes," said Inge, matter-of-factly, "she is of the leather workers."

I then felt superior to Ute. I myself would not make those mistakes. I was Elinor Brinton.

"I will speak high-caste Gorean," I told Inge.

"But you are a barbarian," said Inge.

Briefly I hated her.

I told myself that Inge, with all her pretensions, she of the scribes, would still be a chained slave girl, at the beck and call of a master, when I, Elinor Brinton, was safe on Earth, once again in my snug penthouse. And Ute, too! Foolish, stupid little Ute, who could not even speak her own language correctly! What could that meaningless little thing, pretty as she was, ever be but a man's toy? She was a natural slave girl! She belonged in chains. And Inge, too, for she was arrogant! They would remain on Gor, mastered girls, while I, Elinor Brinton, rich and clever, secure and safe, laughed in my penthouse a world away! How amusing that would be!
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Pages 71 - 72

Here are three different times Elinor is sent out to pick berries. Notice how her honor shines.

Ute and I, tied together by the throat, but otherwise unimpeded, wearing our camisks, like the other girls, under a guard, went off with two buckets to gather berries. There were not many berries, and it was not easy to fill our buckets. I stole berries from Ute's bucket, and had mine filled first. We were not supposed to eat the berries, and I do not think Ute did, but I would slip them inside my mouth when the guard was not looking.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Pages 74 - 75

My hand darted into her leather bucket and seized a handful of berries, and quickly put them in my own. Neither she nor the guard noticed. Ute and the guard were stupid.

I slipped one of the berries into my mouth, taking care that no juices showed on my lips or face.

How clever I was.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 207

When neither the guard nor Techne were looking I stole berries from her buckets, to put in mine, handfuls. Why should I work as hard as she? Also, when they were not looking, I placed berries in my mouth, taking care that the juices not stain my lips, revealing that I had eaten them. I had done this sort of thing often before, when I had picked berries for Targo's caravans. Ute and the guard had never seen. I had fooled them all. I was too clever for them!
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 307

How about when Elinor is being trained in Ko-ro-ba and a disagreement happens in the pen;

"Don't beat me," I wept. "She started it! She slapped me first!"

"Liar!" screamed Inge.

"Liar!" I screamed at her.

Ute was looking at me with disappointment. Lana was laughing.

"The guard was outside," said Lana. "He saw!"

Held by the hair, bent over, my heart sank. I was a slave girl who had been caught in a lie. I trembled. But neither I, nor Inge, was beaten. The guard grinned.

It had not surprised him, as it apparently had Ute, that I was a lying slave girl. He had, apparently, to my irritation, not expected anything else of me. I realized then how I was regarded in the pens.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 176 - 177

We also have the example of how Elinor shows honor when her and Ute are close to being captured;

"El-in-or," she cried. "Slavers! Run!"

"I know," I said.

She looked at me, startled.

I struck her suddenly in the side of the head with the stone.

They must find her, not me!

Ute, moaning, stunned, sank to her hands and knees, shaking her head.

I threw the rock down beside her. The men would assume she had fallen and struck her head.

Quickly I fled back into the brush and hid.

Ute struggled to her feet, but stumbled and fell again, moaning, to her hands and knees.

I saw them seize her.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 246

In fact, Elinor is SO honorable, she is rewarded for her actions;

"This is a penalty brand," he said. "It marks you as a liar."

"Please, Master!" I wept.

"I no longer have patience with you," he said. "Be marked as what you are."

I screamed uncontrollably as he pressed in the iron, holding it firmly into my leg. Then, after some two to four Ihn, he removed it. I could not stop screaming with pain. I smelled the odor of burned flesh, my own. I began to whimper. I could not breathe. I gasped for breath. Still the men held me.

"This penalty brand," said Rask of Treve, lifting another iron from the brazier, again with a tiny letter at its glowing termination, "marks you also as what you are, as a thief."

Please, no, Master!" I wept.

I could not move a muscle of my left leg. It might as well have been locked in a vise. It must wait for the iron.

I screamed again, uncontrollably. I had been branded as a thief.

"This third iron," said Rask of Treve, "is, too, a penalty iron. I mark you with it not for myself, but for Ute."

Through raging tears I saw, white hot, the tiny letter.

"It marks you as a traitress," said Rask of Treve. He looked at me, with fury. "Be marked as a traitress," he said. Then he pressed the third iron into my flesh. As it entered my flesh, biting and searing, I saw Ute watching, her face betraying no emotion. I screamed, and wept, and screamed.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 310

She then spends 18 days in the slave box for being honorable;

I remembered that a slave girl, on my first day in the camp of Rask of Treve, had warned me, that if I lied or stole, I would be beaten and put in the slave box.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 313

On the night of the eighteenth day, Ute, with Inge and Rena, crouched before the box.

"Does El-in-or, the slave, wish to leave the box?" asked Ute.

On my knees in the box, my eyes at the opening, frightened, my fingers on the slit, I whispered, "Yes, El-in-or, the slave, wishes to leave the box."
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 315

I won't go into the details of her description of those 18 days.

In fact, what does all of Book 7 tell us of the honor of Elinor?

Rask offers to give Elinor his cloak . . . the passage reads:

When I leaped up, laughing, shaking my head and hair, he again offered to place his cloak about my shoulders, that my body might be covered when I went to the shed for the work slaves.

It was much honor that he did me, a mere female slave.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 348

But you can easily substitute the word Privilege for the word Honor in this sentence, which is how I've already reasoned the application of slaves and honor.

All other 8 instances of honor in Book 7 are speaking of men.

So now, here again, is the example of Elinor and the wine:

I went to Bosk, of Port Kar. I would pour the wine. Then I would be seized, and, doubtless by nightfall, tortured and impaled.

He held forth the goblet. The eyes of Telima were upon me. I could not look her in the eyes.

I poured the wine.

"I am of Treve," Rask of Treve had told me, in the warehouse, where he stood bound to the wall. "Do not stain my honor."

I wept.

"What is wrong, Elinor?" asked Bosk.

"I am all right, Master," I told him.

"I am of Treve," had said Rask of Treve. "Do not stain my honor."

I hated then men, and their wars, and their cruelties, and their frivolous honors. It was we, their women, who suffered their madness. No Rask of Treve would not purchase his life for the price I had agreed to pay, but the decision was not his, but mine, mine, and I loved him, and could not let him die!

"Do not stain my honor," he had said.

Bosk of Port Kar lifted the cup to his lips.

I put forth my hand. "Do not drink it, Master," I said. "It is poisoned."
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Pages 360 - 361

Now I'll show you what started this chain of events;

The small man bought me for fourteen pieces of gold. I was taken, on tarnback, braceleted and hooded, to the city of Port Kar, in the delta of the mighty Vosk.

In a warehouse, near the piers, I knelt, head down, at their feet.

"I will not serve you," I said.

The small man was there, and the beast, squatting, shaggy, regarding me, and, too, to my surprise, Haakon of Skjern.

"I have felt the iron," I said. "I have felt the whip. I will not kill for you. You may kill me, but I will not kill for you."

They did not beat me, nor threaten me.

They lifted me by the arm, and dragged me to a side room.

I screamed. There, his wrists bound by ropes to rings, stood a bloodied man, head down, stripped to the waist.

"Eleven men died," said Haakon of Skjern, "but we have him."

The man lifted his head, and shook it, clearing his vision. "El-in-or?" he said.

"Master!" I wept.

I pressed myself to him.

He regarded them. Then he said to me, "I am of Treve. Do not stain my honor."

By the hair I was dragged from the presence of Rask of Treve, and his head, again, fell forward on his chest. The door closed.

"In time," said the small man, "You will receive a packet of poison."

I nodded, numbly. Rask of Treve must not die! He must not die!

"You will be placed in the house of Bosk, a merchant of Port Kar," he said. "You will be placed in the kitchen of that house, and you will be used to serve his table."

"I can't," I wept. "I cannot kill!"

"Then Rask of Treve dies," said the small man. Haakon of Skjern laughed.

The small man held up a tiny packet. "This," he said, "is the poison, a powder prepared from the venom of the Ost."

I shuddered. Death by ost venom is among the most hideous of deaths.

I wondered how it was that they could so hate this man, he called Bosk of Port Kar.

"You will comply?" asked the small man.

I nodded my head.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Pages 356 - 357

Rask told her "Do not stain my honor."
He didn't say "Elinor, do not stain your honor."

So, is it possible the motivation for Elinor warning Bosk at the last moment stemmed from her selfishness, her yet again, wanting things her way wanting life on her terms . . . or purely from her honor?

Now, reasonably, does this view of slave honor mean when a Free Woman is enslaved, she loses her honor? If she was an honorable person while free, does she instantly lose her Integrity, Dignity and Moral Fortitude?

No, that would be silly.
The reason it can be said slaves do not have honor is because honor is not what guides them.

Slaves do not have the option of weighing a Master's command against their own Moral Fortitude.

Do you go to the slave market, and after interviewing a couple prospects you tell the Slaver, I'll take the redhead instead of the blonde because the redhead is honorable?

I hope the example of Elinor, studied in depth, gives you a more clear picture of slave honor.

Yes, one could say some slaves can have honor, they just can't act on it.







Supporting References


"Why do the slaves wear purple?" I asked Misk. "That is the color of the robes of a Ubar."

"Because it is a great honor to be the slave of Priest-Kings," said Misk.
Priest-Kings of Gor     Book 3     Page 91


"The collar was sewn on the girl in this very house," said he, "though the poor thing was anesthetized at the time and unaware of the honor bestowed upon her." Saphrar smiled.
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 197


"Are you not grateful?" inquired Cernus, puzzled.

Elizabeth dropped to her knees, head down. "I am unworthy of so great an honor, Master," said she.
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 48


It is a great mark of prestige among slave girls to be selected for sale from the great block in the Curulean, and girls tend to compete viciously among themselves for this honor.
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 112


"You are superb," I said. I knew her, of course, to be an extremely intelligent, capable woman. This I had sensed in her from the first. Also, of course, had I not even known her I would have supposed her a remarkable person, for she was said to be the finest trainer of girls in the city of Ar, and that honor, dubious though it might be, would not be likely to have been achieved without considerable gifts, and among them most certainly those of unusual intelligence.
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 257


When I leaped up, laughing, shaking my head and hair, he again offered to place his cloak about my shoulders, that my body might be covered when I went to the shed for the work slaves.

It was much honor that he did me, a mere female slave.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 348


I wondered at women. It seems that they, in reality, care for tender, loving men, who treat them with great consideration and solicitude. Yet, in their dreams, it seems they find themselves forced to surrender, totally, to fierce, dominating masters, who insolently and cruelly, though often with ironic courtesy and tenderness, exact from their bodies, over a period of hours, every last minute sensation of response of which their bodies are capable, strong men, warriors, who, patiently, permit them no shield, who permit them to withhold nothing, who permit them to save not a particle of their honor, who will force them to yield themselves totally, helplessly, in complete and utter surrender.
Hunters of Gor     Book 8     Page 166


"You were treated with great kindness. You were not put in the kitchens. You were not given to tharlarion drivers. You were taken into our own apartments. You were permitted to sleep in my own chamber, at the foot of my couch. You were trained diligently as a lady's maid."

"Yes, Mistress," said the girl.

"Is that not a great honor for a slave slut?"

"Yes, Mistress," said the girl.
Slave Girl of Gor     Book 11     Pages 115 - 116


Thandar of Ti looked in our direction. We knelt, two beautiful slave girls, lowly pierced-ear girls, paga slaves. It was a great honor for girls such as we that a man such as Thandar of Ti would even deign to cast a glance upon us.
Slave Girl of Gor     Book 11     Page 299


I touched her on the neck with the whip. "Put your head down, Slave," I said. She did so. "Although you are only a slave your master is permitting you to serve him," I said. "This is a great honor." She seemed startled. Then it became clear to her that this was, for her, a slave, an honor.
Slave Girl of Gor     Book 11     Page 406


"Yes," she said, "it is a great honor for a girl to be branded by a Warrior, and one who is a Captain."
Beasts of Gor     Book 12     Page 441


When I had served him wine he gave me, too, to drink of the cup. This was, in its way, a great honor, and a token of his recognition as to how I stood to him. I still, of course, did not dare to drink from the same edge of the cup as he, the master.
Slave Girl of Gor     Book 11     Page 442


I had failed to relate well to her, in spite of being solicitous and charming, courteous and attentive, in spite of treating her with honor, and with dignity and respect. I treated her as my equal and I was, in return, subjected to ill treatment and scorn.
Fighting Slave of Gor     Book 14     Page 116


"It is a great honor for me, Master," she said, "that one such as you should select Beverly to serve you."
Rogue of Gor     Book 15     Page 200


"I acknowledge you as the courier of Ragnar Voskjard," she said. "I acknowledge you as a great and important man. And I acknowledge myself as only a miserable slave. It is a great honor for me that you have selected me out, from the others, to be sent to your chambers this night, to serve you."
Rogue of Gor     Book 15     Page 205


"Thank you, Master," she said, "for permitting me the honor of your couch."
Rogue of Gor     Book 15     Page 218


"I am a slave," she said. "I need the touch of a man."

"But you have been rescued from sex," I said. "You have been accorded honor and dignity. You have been made identical to a certain form of male. This is supposed to be what you want. You are now, your nature betrayed and nullified, supposed to be happy and fulfilled."

"I am miserable," she wept.
Blood Brothers of Gor     Book 18     Page 166


"Sit in the chair," he said.

"I dare not!" I said. The thought of sitting in such a chair terrified me. It was the chair of a free person. I was a slave. I might be whipped, or slain, for sitting in such a chair. The greatest honor I might expect in connection with such a chair was to be permitted to crouch or lie at its foot, or, perhaps, to be chained by the neck to its side.

"Is a command to be repeated?" he asked.

"No, Master!" I said. I hurried to the chair and, small and frightened, sat down within it.
Kajira of Gor     Book 19     Pages 334 - 335


"I beg the inestimable honor and privilege of being made an absolute slave," she said.
Renegades of Gor     Book 23     Page 365


"The ship will be decorated," I said. "You and Claudia will be displayed at the prow."

"I have heard that," she whispered. "How will we be dressed for that honor?"

"You will be naked," I said.

"And in chains?" she asked.

"Yes," I said, "or perhaps ropes. You surely know how women are displayed at prows."

"How will it be done?" she asked.

"You will probably be hung there," I said, "one on each side of the prow."

"Doubtless it is a great honor," she said.

"Yes," I said.

"But," she said, "I gather, given the apparent desire to protect the slaves of Ar's Station, it is only to be expected that it be Claudia and I, and we alone, who are to be accorded that honor."

"Yes, "I said. "But do not fear. I am sure that both of you, even if there were a cargo of superb captures aboard, would still be excellent candidates for the honor."
Renegades of Gor     Book 23     Page 400


"You are now kneeling on a couch," said the fellow, "which, for a female slave, is a great honor. You may be months into your bondage before you are again permitted such an honor."
Magicians of Gor     Book 25     Page 9


"I am prepared to extend to you the extraordinary and inestimable privilege," she said, "of entering upon the same couch with me."

He looked at her.

"Yes," she said.

"I am unworthy!" he said.

"Are the sluts, thrown by the hair to their masters' couches any the more worthy?" she asked.

"No, Mistress," he said.

"Do not concern yourself then with such matters," she said.

"But so much honor!" he said.
Magicians of Gor     Book 25     Pages 451 - 452


She is thus commonly slept on the floor, at the foot of the couch. She is also, commonly, when the heat of the master is upon him, used there, by the slave ring to which she is chained. It was a great honor, of course, to be allowed upon the surface of the couch.
Witness of Gor     Book 26     Page 645


"It can be very pleasant for the slave, as well," said Mirus. "It can give her many warm and delicious feelings, the honor of being permitted to approach and serve masters, the understanding that she is wanted, and desired, and owned, the gratification of being enabled to display herself, in the order of nature, as an acknowledged and total female before strong men, and so on."
Prize of Gor     Book 27     Page 102


I love my master. I want to serve him, and please him, with my whole being, with my whole body, with my whole heart and soul. The master is the meaning of the slave's life, and she rejoices in her collar, that she belongs to him. What an incredible privilege, what an incredible honor, to be the slave of such a man!
Prize of Gor     Book 27     Page 173


What a precious and glorious honor, what a coveted privilege, for a slave, to be permitted to serve her master!
Prize of Gor     Book 27     Page 228


"You may kiss the free man's feet, and beg to be found pleasing," I said.

I then felt her lips at my feet.

"You may both kiss, and lick, lovingly, deferentially," I said. "It is a great honor for a slave girl to do this, for he is a free man, and she is a mere slave."
Swordsmen of Gor     Book 29     Page 276


"You may thank your master," I told her.

"Thank you, Master," she said. "Jane, your slave, thanks you for having her collared, for permitting her to wear your collar, for deigning to grant her the honor of wearing your collar."
Swordsmen of Gor     Book 29     Page 305


She had begged my collar. I consented to the piteous pleas of the slave, and would honor her with my collar, which I then locked on her neck.
Swordsmen of Gor     Book 29     Page 554


"And at the end of the day," I said, "you may expect to be chained at your master's slave ring."

"Surely I would be permitted on his couch," she said.

"Such honor," I said, "for a slave?"

"Master?"

"Do you think you would be a free companion?" I asked.

"No, Master," she said.

"Expect to be chained to his slave ring, on the floor, at the foot of his couch."
Mariners of Gor     Book 30     Page 308


In passing, one might mention the blond, barbarian slave, Saru. It may be recalled she was not a ship slave, but the personal slave of Lord Nishida. On the other hand, as far as I know, supposedly because of certain reservations pertaining to the nature and quality of her character, he had never deigned to honor her with slave use. It seems he regarded her as unworthy to be his slave.
Mariners of Gor     Book 30     Pages 387 - 388


Shortly thereafter the slaves rose to their feet and, a bit later, I could smell the fumes of freshly brewed black wine. It shortly made its appearance. Alcinoë, as she was Gorean, had the honor of bringing forth the vessel and cups, and my slave, as she was a barbarian, and thus subordinate, unless it was otherwise specified, brought forth the small pitcher of cream, the tiny spoons, and the small, flat bowls of sugars and spices.
Mariners of Gor     Book 30     Page 579


I have spoken of collar pride. I soon learned collar pride. I learned that I was "slave beautiful," and that the female slave is the most desirable and exciting of human females. What woman would be immune to such flattery, the flattery of chains, the tunic, the collar, the whip? What woman, in her vanity, would be insensible of the compliment paid to her, the compliment of thongs and bracelets? How could she be unaware of the tribute and honor paid to her, that she should be cast amongst the least and most worthless of animals, the most desirable of women, the female slave?
Conspirators of Gor     Book 31     Page 41


"Do you not groom your masters?" he asked.

"We attend to them in all the ways of the slave," I said. "We may dress them, tie their sandals, bathe them, and such."

"It is an honor for you to do so, is it not?" he asked.

"Yes, Master," I said. "It is a great honor and privilege for a slave to be permitted to serve her Master."
Conspirators of Gor     Book 31     Pages 470 - 471


"You are kneeling," I said.

"As is fitting," she said. "A slave often kneels before free persons. It is my honor and joy to serve a free person."
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 33


Indeed, it is something of an honor for a slave, I suppose, to be the property of one who possesses a Home Stone.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 111


Paula squirmed a little, frightened, her ankles bound.

"Try to get up and run," I thought to myself, "golden-tarsk girl! Your opaque, silken tunic, and your sandals, will avail you nothing now. You are no more now than another tethered slave."

"I have the honor, as I understand it," said Paula, regarding Kurik, "of addressing Lord Grendel."
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 426


We dare not raise our voice in their presence, and, if we are permitted the honor of speaking to them, will commonly do so softly, head down, with extreme deference.
Quarry of Gor     Book 35     Page 47


"Not at all," she said. "It is merely that she, as many kajirae, are insufficiently cognizant of the honor and privilege of belonging to a free woman."
Quarry of Gor     Book 35     Page 238


Some slaves with private masters are allowed to share the master's couch. This is a sign of great favor, and often a slave must serve long and well before being granted so great a privilege and honor.
Quarry of Gor     Book 35     Page 371
























 



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